Nat'l signing day

My fear for the 2019 class is that coaches like Urban Meyer swoop in and poach UW's commits.  I have the misfortune of living an hour from Columbus and hear all about their recruiting.  As soon as UW offers the WR from Maryland who is there?  yep Meyer to offer.  And I think he did it with the QB who has committed to UW.

At some point these kids have to know two big things- the Badgers have a running game which means QBs have lots of success with play action; and Paul Chryst’s ability to produce professional QBs should not be in question. From the time he was running the offense under Barry, to Bielema, to now, he gets guys to the NFL running a pro system in college and the program is as high profile as you can get. 

So if you’re a kid with elite QB ability and a desire to play in the pros, why would you look past UW? 

Music City posted:

At some point these kids have to know two big things- the Badgers have a running game which means QBs have lots of success with play action; and Paul Chryst’s ability to produce professional QBs should not be in question. From the time he was running the offense under Barry, to Bielema, to now, he gets guys to the NFL running a pro system in college and the program is as high profile as you can get. 

So if you’re a kid with elite QB ability and a desire to play in the pros, why would you look past UW? 

This is what they should look at. 

Russell Wilson, 2011 with Chryst as the offensive coordinator

14 games, 225-309 (72.8%), 3175 yards, 33 TDs, 4 INTs. That's an NFL QB rating of 135.8. 

ammo posted:

Because Chryst is not Urban Meyer or Nick Sabin.   The perception of them being superior is hard to overcome. 

But honestly how many QB's has Meyer or Saban put in the NFL?  Meyer has Tebow I guess Alex Smith and Saban has ummm McCarron (or whatever his name is) that is the backup QB in Cincy.   Meyer's offensive system doesn't do the QB's any favors really and Saban's offense has tons of talent but it isn't exactly great.

If I had a kid who was a pro style passer you almost have to look at schools like UW because they play as close to the pro style as you can get.

Tschmack posted:

Wilson set the NCAA record for pass efficiency at UW.  Chryst knows how to develop QBs.  Not to mention they always have good OL and RB- a QBs best friend. 

Why not Wisconsin 

Don't forget that since 2000 the Badgers have had 6 TEs play at least a year in the NFL.

They've also had 14 WRs play at least a year in the NFL since 2000. They've had 13 RBs play in the NFL since 2000.

So basically, you get to play behind what is typically an NFL quality OL (usually with at least one future Pro Bowler), with skill position players that are at least NFL roster quality.

Russell Wilson is an outlier obviously, but Jim Sorgi, Brooks Bollinger, and Scott Tolzien have all spent at least 5 years on NFL rosters. I think NFL coaches are comfortable with Wisconsin QBs as backups because they know they are familiar with Pro systems instead of having played in a spread offense in college. This makes them decent guys to have as a QB that can come in and execute an offense for a game or two (even if they aren't physically able to be starters).

Michigan,  great thought on the UW QB's.  We all know that with the exception of Wilson none of them have been world beaters but I agree that I think NFL coaches know they will be able to come in and manage the game because of familiarity with the pro system. 

Now I am not saying we are going to have a golden age of UW QB's but I do think that as time goes by if schools produce NFL style QB's they will be more and more valuable.  NFL teams want the slightest learning curve as possible and don't want to teach the how to play the game to the spread option QB's.  I don't remember where I read it but one NFL QB coach said he had to teach a spread QB how to hold his hands under center and how to just drop back 3-5 steps.

The Heckler posted:

Michigan,  great thought on the UW QB's.  We all know that with the exception of Wilson none of them have been world beaters but I agree that I think NFL coaches know they will be able to come in and manage the game because of familiarity with the pro system. 

Now I am not saying we are going to have a golden age of UW QB's but I do think that as time goes by if schools produce NFL style QB's they will be more and more valuable.  NFL teams want the slightest learning curve as possible and don't want to teach the how to play the game to the spread option QB's.  I don't remember where I read it but one NFL QB coach said he had to teach a spread QB how to hold his hands under center and how to just drop back 3-5 steps.

Good comments. Imagine what Cam Newton would have looked like had he played in the Wisconsin system (of course, we didn't make a bid in his father's auction like several SEC teams). It's a lot easier to learn fundamentals like footwork when you are 18 than when you are 23.

As to what QBs Urban Meyer and Nick Saban have produced - they've all peaked in college. Tua Tagovailoa might end up being the best pro QB they've produced between them.

Another thing - Badgers RBs, TEs, and WRs learn how to block. It's probably why a lot of them hang around a long time as backups and special teamers.

Cormac Sampson is in the same class/high school as my daughter.  Good kid, good athlete.  Reminds me of Happ when he's playing BB.  Really, really good footwork around the hoop.  Strong as a bull.

Ironically, his dad was my HS English teacher as a senior.

I do have a question for anyone here with an opinion on it.  Why is it that everyone says UW is such a hard sell for recruits?  Location? Weather? Academic Standards? or is it just as simple as the UW football program is considered "boring"?

I grew up near GB and I have only been to Madison once in my lifetime when I saw UW lose to NW something like 6-3 in the early 80's.  I had an absolute blast in Madison and I have nieces and nephews that go there and every single person raves about the place.  Even my in laws from Illinois say UW is one of the best.

I guess the first thing people will say is the weather.  But it isn't like the rest of the Big Ten isn't cold and if you have spent any time during the winter in Michigan, PA, or god awful Ohio (which is where I live) it isn't like UW is any worse. 

It isn't like the city is that remote either.  If you think it is try driving to State College, Pa sometime talk about a place that is small and REMOTE. 

Sorry for the ramble but I was just curious what others think.

The Heckler posted:

I do have a question for anyone here with an opinion on it.  Why is it that everyone says UW is such a hard sell for recruits?  Location? Weather? Academic Standards? or is it just as simple as the UW football program is considered "boring"?

I grew up near GB and I have only been to Madison once in my lifetime when I saw UW lose to NW something like 6-3 in the early 80's.  I had an absolute blast in Madison and I have nieces and nephews that go there and every single person raves about the place.  Even my in laws from Illinois say UW is one of the best.

I guess the first thing people will say is the weather.  But it isn't like the rest of the Big Ten isn't cold and if you have spent any time during the winter in Michigan, PA, or god awful Ohio (which is where I live) it isn't like UW is any worse. 

It isn't like the city is that remote either.  If you think it is try driving to State College, Pa sometime talk about a place that is small and REMOTE. 

Sorry for the ramble but I was just curious what others think.

I've lived all over the country and been to almost all the campuses in the Big 10 (I've not been to Rutgers or Penn State). Madison is probably one of the prettiest campuses in the country, and probably the best in the Big 10 (Northwestern might be the only competition with the view of Lake Michigan in Evanston). It's hard to beat sitting on the Terrace on a nice day. It's certainly nicer than Notre Dame, Oklahoma, and most of the SEC campuses. Yes, it gets cold in December through February, but I can't imagine it's comfortable to do summer practices in Tuscaloosa, Baton Rouge, Tallahassee, Clemson, etc.

I think there's a perception that the athletic programs are "boring." Basketball has the same problem. Madison is nicer campus than Lexington, Kentucky or Lawrence, Kansas among others, but it just doesn't have the history.

Badger sports suffered from about a 5 decade dry spell, and people 45 and older never heard Keith Jackson (or Billy Packer/Dick Vitale in basketball) calling big national TV games from Madison in the 1960s-1980s when college football and basketball really exploded in public consciousness. That's what Wisconsin suffers from, the lack of prestige from previous generations. At least that's the only thing that makes sense to me given the football team has now been good for 25 years and elite for 20 years (6 top 10 finishes in that time frame). The basketball team has been to 6 Sweet 16s in the last 7 years and is going to miss the tournament for the first time this century this year. Yet, despite developing NBA lottery picks (Devin Harris, Kaminsky, Dekker) and having 32 alumni on opening day NFL rosters this year they can't get the equivalent of 5 star guys consistently to either program.

MichiganPacker posted:
They've also had 14 WRs play at least a year in the NFL since 2000. They've had 13 RBs play in the NFL since 2000.

 

I’m guessing a couple or more from the current group are going to be pretty good Pros. Chryst is finally through cleaning up Anderson’s recruiting mess... these young kids are really good (and the incoming ones look promising too!). 

The Heckler posted:

 NFL teams want the slightest learning curve as possible and don't want to teach the how to play the game to the spread option QB's.  I don't remember where I read it but one NFL QB coach said he had to teach a spread QB how to hold his hands under center and how to just drop back 3-5 steps.

I don’t think too many UW QBs require a poster board with pictures on the sideline to tell the QB what coverage the opposition is in...

The Heckler posted:

I do have a question for anyone here with an opinion on it.  Why is it that everyone says UW is such a hard sell for recruits?  Location? Weather? Academic Standards? or is it just as simple as the UW football program is considered "boring"?

UW expects their athletes to actually study, attend classes, and even get passing grades.

QuietOne posted:
The Heckler posted:

I do have a question for anyone here with an opinion on it.  Why is it that everyone says UW is such a hard sell for recruits?  Location? Weather? Academic Standards? or is it just as simple as the UW football program is considered "boring"?

UW expects their athletes to actually study, attend classes, and even get passing grades.

One thing that's always bothered me is how difficult it is to find out how many of these "student-athletes" actually did in school. The guys that go to the NFL combine and get every physical trait imaginable measured while parading around in shorts (where images are available on the internet) and often have detailed medical histories discussed publically are the same guys who we can't find out how they did in college classes because of "privacy" concerns. It would be interesting to see how Cam Newton did in his classes at Auburn, for instance. He's clearly not a dumb guy (say like Vince Young) and did he end up actually taking any classes that he learned anything from?

I think it's cool we can find online that Frank Kaminsky made the dean's list and got his Bachelors degree in Life Science Communications. It looks pretty likely that Nigel Hayes got a Bachelors degree in Business Finance and Investment Banking. http://www.seniorclassaward.com/athletes/nigel_hayes/

 

Music City posted:
MichiganPacker posted:
They've also had 14 WRs play at least a year in the NFL since 2000. They've had 13 RBs play in the NFL since 2000.

 

I’m guessing a couple or more from the current group are going to be pretty good Pros. Chryst is finally through cleaning up Anderson’s recruiting mess... these young kids are really good (and the incoming ones look promising too!). 

And I also think they are coached so well that they aren't going to back down from anyone.  You can also see that they are physical, aggressive but at the same time they conduct themselves with class.

I worry a little bit about the 2019 class because there is a TON of time left for guys like Urban Meyer to work their magic in flipping recruits.  No matter how strong of a commit you might be it still would be hard to resist recruiters like him.

Thanks for the answers to my question about UW recruiting.  You guys gave me exactly what I thought was the answer.  UW may not be one of the blue blood programs but if they keep winning and players want to play maybe UW will be more of an option.

SanDiegoPackFan posted:

gotta keep trying to compete with the Big Boys on getting those QB's.  We know the OLine and RB's will always come to UW, but getting consistent good QB play has always been our nemesis.

I think with Chryst at the helm I think that might slowly change.  If you watch UW play now sure they do the 3 yards and cloud of dust thing but you can see that they are making a real effort to be balanced offensively and throwing the football.  And throwing it not out of desperation like in years past but being aggressive with it.  What I think will get UW of the hump with QB play is to get one guy in there who puts up some gaudy/decent passing stats. 

DH13 posted:

Can't wait to see the backs of these jerseys:

Chase Wolf 

Aron Cruickshank

Rachad Wildgoose, Jr. (seriously!?)

Mason Platter

Cormac Sampson

Taj Mustapha

My soph son played against both Platter and Sampson in conference play this year - I honed in on those two guys when we played against them.  It seemed like the game came quite easy to them and they didn't seem to get frustrated even though they rarely had any plays run their way.  They both flowed to the ball very well.

Additionally, prior to the season there was a 7:7 flag football league that my son played against these two guys.  It was pretty cool to see Sampson covering my son (my son is a fast RB and Sampson had a difficult time keeping up with him).  That said, Sampson never got frustrated by it and embraced the challenge - he was able to use angles to cut the difference in speed.  Our QB was absolutely terrible and Sampson ended up picking off two passes, so he has really good ball skills.  Sampson's teammates were cocky, arrogant pricks that often turned it into bump/push football instead of flag.  One play my son was running a deep crossing route and got in front of Sampson by a couple yards...one of Sampson's teammates was playing deep center and made a play on the ball that was basically initiating contact with my son to send him somewhat violently backward - Sampson quickly braced my son from falling to the ground and ensured he wasn't hurt.  He then made a point to scold his teammate (who had begun to celebrate breaking up the play).  I became a Cormac Sampson fan at that moment.

States w/ highest % of HS football players recruited by a DI school:
1. Florida
2. Georgia
3. Louisiana
4-8. (DC), MD, TN, SC, NC

70% of 4/5 star recruits come from 10 states, including many of these and Ca, Tx and Oh.

Wisconsin is in the bottom 5 along with NM, MN, VT, & ME

 

College football in the south is a whole different creature than it is elsewhere in the country. I think the Badgers will never compete at the top level because of all the reasons mentioned. The elite talent from the south will not come north because they have to give up too much celebrity;  staying eligible takes a little too much work; the weather takes a little too much endurance.

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