“McCarthy and coaching staff spent a large part of bye week on self scouting. A key conclusion: "The run game needs attempts. That's really the biggest thing coming out of the self scout."

Quote from Mike after the bye week last year. Mike ran less after the bye week. Mike was not good. 

From the article:  Under Mike McCarthy the past 13 seasons, Green Bay traveled primarily by air. The Packers ranked in the top-10 in rushing offense just once under McCarthy and were in the bottom-12 a whopping seven times

I think now more than ever its important to run the football.  In today's pass happy NFL you can control the clock and keep your defense fresh by running the ball.  Now I am not saying to run a wing T offense and only pass 3 times a game but good things will happen when you find that balance.

heyward posted:

It's easy to talk about running the ball in June. Let's see what happens in September when 12 is taking actual snaps and itching to throw.

Big difference when the new HC has a history as HC/OC of committing to the run vs a HC who had a long, long history of talking about running the ball then rarely doing it. Or splitting carries evenly between a stud RB, a serviceable RB and a pile of crap. 

Henry posted:

I don't give a shit if the pass 90% of the time if they win.

“There’s nothing balanced about 50% run-50% pass, ’cause that’s 50% stupid. What is balance is when you have five skill positions and all five of them are contributing to the effort in somewhat equal fashion — that’s balance. This notion that if you hand one guy 50% of the time and then you throw it to a combination of two guys the other 50% that you’re really balanced. You probably pat yourself on the back and tell yourself that. People have been doing that for decades. Well, then you’re delusional.” - Mike Leach

Get the ball in the hands of Adams, Jones, MVS, Allison, EQ, Williams, Graham, Stern, etc. as much and as often as possible. Doesn't matter how it's accomplished, just put the ball in their hands and you will score points. 

Yup, Balance. I'm looking forward to not only running the ball, but using the running backs in the passing game. Creates another dimension ....and the threat of doing so draws a defender....opens up certain routes to the TE and WR's for example.  

2018 NFL Stats :

No team threw fewer passes to RBs than GB (15.9%)

Two of the NFL's best QBs (Brady, Brees) led NFL in RB-target rate last yr

Successful offenses based on balance, dimension, deception, scheming guys open, etc......call it what you want. It works. 

It's not just about "finally" running the ball, or "finally" throwing to the TE. That will be exciting, but the added threat of doing so and keeping the opposing defense off balance....that's the exciting part. Adding dimension and deception. We haven't been doing that for some time.....plays not only became stagnant to us casuals, but opposing defenses seemed to know what was coming(cause they did know what was coming) .

Can't wait. 

Balance is relative in today's game.  While 50/50 is not an "optimal balance", neither is 70/30.  I think we'll know it when we see it.  Because we'll see consistent success both running and throwing it, whatever the mix is.  That's what's really at the root the whole balance issue.

PackerHawk posted:
heyward posted:

It's easy to talk about running the ball in June. Let's see what happens in September when 12 is taking actual snaps and itching to throw.

Big difference when the new HC has a history as HC/OC of committing to the run vs a HC who had a long, long history of talking about running the ball then rarely doing it. Or splitting carries evenly between a stud RB, a serviceable RB and a pile of crap. 

LaFleur’s “history” consists of one season with an injured Marcus Mariota and Blaine Gabbert at QB and no decent receivers. 

New England won two of the last three SBs. 2019 and 2017. Both years they ranked 3rd in rushing attempts. 2018 season they averaged 30 rushing attempts/game. The 2016 season they averaged 30 attempts/game.

That's how you protect a QB. Very simple. That's balance. Keep the opposing D playing honest and off of your star QB, without their ears constantly pinned back in complete pass rush mode. Packers were worst, or near worst in rushing attempts/game both seasons.

Brady was sacked 21 times in the 2018 season. Aaron Rodgers was sacked 53 times. (Also 51 times in 2017, 35 times in 2016, 47 times in 2015...).

I just want the Packers to run the rock 30+ times/game, with our RBs, not including QB scrambles. That is where we will win a sh!t ton of games, and keep our own star QB healthy. Can't win a SB if Aaron isn't there for it.

Belichick knows what he is doing. I believe LaFleur understands the value of this part of the game. We'll see. Running the rock, and Guiness, is good for you!

NE may have averaged 30 att/game, but they didn't run it 30 times every game. NE runs heavily against teams that can be run on, they pass heavily against teams that can be passed on. 1/3 of the games they ran the ball <25 times, 1/3 of the games they ran the ball >35 times. Belichick isn't locked into a delusion that you have to do anything but hammer your opponents weaknesses with everything you have. If you can't defend the run, he's going to run it 47 times like he did against Buffalo. If you can't defend the pass, he's going to throw it 43 times like he did against Indianapolis. Both instances the balance was way off. Take advantage of the situational football, spread the ball around to all of your playmakers, and don't get trapped in the idea that you have to play one scheme or one style of football on any given week. That's what MF needs to do to be successful. 

Oh, yeah. I totally agree Grave Digger. Totally. I just want Aaron healthy and in good shape at the end to win another SB. That's all.

Figure, Aaron rushes roughly 5 times per game. Take those away from our paltry 23 attempts/game average over the years, and our backs are lucky to get 10 carries a piece some games. That was so wrong. Can't win that way. And, we didn't.

LaFleur is going to be a welcome change. I can't wait to see what he does.

Grave Digger posted:

NE may have averaged 30 att/game, but they didn't run it 30 times every game. NE runs heavily against teams that can be run on, they pass heavily against teams that can be passed on. 1/3 of the games they ran the ball <25 times, 1/3 of the games they ran the ball >35 times. Belichick isn't locked into a delusion that you have to do anything but hammer your opponents weaknesses with everything you have. If you can't defend the run, he's going to run it 47 times like he did against Buffalo. If you can't defend the pass, he's going to throw it 43 times like he did against Indianapolis. Both instances the balance was way off. Take advantage of the situational football, spread the ball around to all of your playmakers, and don't get trapped in the idea that you have to play one scheme or one style of football on any given week. That's what MF needs to do to be successful. 

Where is "We Do what we do"?

Alvin Kamara touched the ball about 18 times per game in 2018, Sony Michel about 16, Kareem Hunt about 18, Todd Gurley about 22, Melvin Gordon about 18. Aaron Jones about 13 and Jamaal Williams about 9. Those numbers need to increase obviously. Get the ball to skill players regardless of the method. 

heyward posted:
PackerHawk posted:
heyward posted:

It's easy to talk about running the ball in June. Let's see what happens in September when 12 is taking actual snaps and itching to throw.

Big difference when the new HC has a history as HC/OC of committing to the run vs a HC who had a long, long history of talking about running the ball then rarely doing it. Or splitting carries evenly between a stud RB, a serviceable RB and a pile of crap. 

LaFleur’s “history” consists of one season with an injured Marcus Mariota and Blaine Gabbert at QB and no decent receivers. 

And a year as OC with the Rams. No, he didn't call the plays. But he's a disciple of Kyle Shanahan and Sean McVay. He believes in their philosophy and that's what we are going to see in Green Bay. It's not gonna like like Tennessee obviously with Aaron Rodgers vs their trash at QB/WR but it's still going to be that philosophy. Rodgers isn't dumb, he saw how the old plan limited what they could get done offensively. 

The days of Pittsburgh Macho, "we do what we do" and that stale ****ing playbook from 2007 (that was supposedly "scrubbed" in 2018) are gone. 

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