Skip to main content

Ground up rooster combs.  The job I had required me to kneel a lot (No jokes please). I repaired HVAC equipment in schools so I was on the roof a lot fixing rooftop AC units (Look at the roof at your neighborhood school and try to count the units) and kitchen eq. One day working in a kitchen I rocked back and felt a pop and pain. I was wearing a pad and kneeling on a foam mat. Workman's comp BS followed. MRI showed nothing. Therapy no help. Finally they "authorized" the gel shot. I needed help to get to my truck after it. Didn't help the knee at all. Then we fought for exploratory surgery. Since there was no evidence of damage in the MRI Comp didn't want to pay but they finally relented.

Then covid hit so surgery was delayed. Finally it happen and I had a major meniscus tear and a plica membrane tear. Most of the meniscus is gone. Can't kneel for any length of time any more so I retired at 62. Doctor told me structurely my knee is that of a 20 yr. old. I told him to give it back to him!

Knee replacement here. Ten days after surgery I was about to use only a cane and feeling great when all hell broke loose in my joint. Bleeding into the surgical site, pain galore, trip to ER. Told to take it easy and take painkillers. I did for 24 hours. Then something grew on my knee that was an inch tall and two inches long and about a quarter-inch wide and seeping and weeping. Massive infection. Doc opens up my knee to wash it all out and I do the IV antibiotics thing.

Things look good to go home on day three, but as doc unwraps the bandages, it was obvious that the infection was back. Emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis. ICU after that for 24 hours. Then IV antibiotics through a pic line and an antiobiotic-infused cement "block" in the joint and a cement rod down my inner bone. Six weeks later, all clear.

At eight weeks, I get another new knee. For 18 months all is well, but I cannot bend the knee like I should be able to, and going down stairs it doesn't bend far enough to allow me to go down or up easily; it was like a doorstop was preventing it from bending the required number of degrees. Got to Mayo Clinic (best thing in MN). Doc says, "The surgeon put in the correct knee, but a carpenter can do that. You need a different prosthesis and that requires an artist." Out comes the second knee; in goes a third. Success.

After surgery, doc says, "For god's sake, do not even shave your legs for fear of getting a cut and another infection. Your knee and muscles are like hamburger, and any infection may mean losing your leg." Today, about eight years later, my knee still hurts. I cannot run at all or kneel on it. I can walk and am able to do so most days without any limp. I go down the stairs with a bit of fear it might collapse; up is also hard.

They also discovered that I'm allergic to the primary blood thinner, warfarin, which is used to prevent clots. Once I take it, it starts to work but then goes off the charts and won't stop thinning my blood even if I go totally off it, and that's what caused the bleeding into the surgical site after the first surgery.

Moral of the story: not all knee replacements are easy peasy; some are a fukkin' bitchin' mess from start to finish. Sometimes I wish I hadn't done it, but I was walking around with no cartilage on the femur or the tibia, so every step was like sandpaper rubbing in the joint. No amount of jell was going to help. If anyone here has a replacement, I hope it goes a heck of a lot better than mine!

@Fandame posted:

Knee replacement here. Ten days after surgery I was about to use only a cane and feeling great when all hell broke loose in my joint. Bleeding into the surgical site, pain galore, trip to ER. Told to take it easy and take painkillers. I did for 24 hours. Then something grew on my knee that was an inch tall and two inches long and about a quarter-inch wide and seeping and weeping. Massive infection. Doc opens up my knee to wash it all out and I do the IV antibiotics thing.

Things look good to go home on day three, but as doc unwraps the bandages, it was obvious that the infection was back. Emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis. ICU after that for 24 hours. Then IV antibiotics through a pic line and an antiobiotic-infused cement "block" in the joint and a cement rod down my inner bone. Six weeks later, all clear.

At eight weeks, I get another new knee. For 18 months all is well, but I cannot bend the knee like I should be able to, and going down stairs it doesn't bend far enough to allow me to go down or up easily; it was like a doorstop was preventing it from bending the required number of degrees. Got to Mayo Clinic (best thing in MN). Doc says, "The surgeon put in the correct knee, but a carpenter can do that. You need a different prosthesis and that requires an artist." Out comes the second knee; in goes a third. Success.

After surgery, doc says, "For god's sake, do not even shave your legs for fear of getting a cut and another infection. Your knee and muscles are like hamburger, and any infection may mean losing your leg." Today, about eight years later, my knee still hurts. I cannot run at all or kneel on it. I can walk and am able to do so most days without any limp. I go down the stairs with a bit of fear it might collapse; up is also hard.

They also discovered that I'm allergic to the primary blood thinner, warfarin, which is used to prevent clots. Once I take it, it starts to work but then goes off the charts and won't stop thinning my blood even if I go totally off it, and that's what caused the bleeding into the surgical site after the first surgery.

Moral of the story: not all knee replacements are easy peasy; some are a fukkin' bitchin' mess from start to finish. Sometimes I wish I hadn't done it, but I was walking around with no cartilage on the femur or the tibia, so every step was like sandpaper rubbing in the joint. No amount of jell was going to help. If anyone here has a replacement, I hope it goes a heck of a lot better than mine!

Words can’t express how bad I feel for you Fandame.

@R MaN posted:

Words can’t express how bad I feel for you Fandame.

Thanks, R MaN. It's been about eight or nine years, and I've learned to live with it. I can walk pretty well for all of that mess. Despite having breast cancer about six years ago, the knee was some pretty awful stuff -- and I didn't even mention how a doctor gave me a lot of demerol without instructions how to get off of it and... let's just say that I'm really glad to be here today!

@Fandame posted:

Thanks, R MaN. It's been about eight or nine years, and I've learned to live with it. I can walk pretty well for all of that mess. Despite having breast cancer about six years ago, the knee was some pretty awful stuff -- and I didn't even mention how a doctor gave me a lot of demerol without instructions how to get off of it and... let's just say that I'm really glad to be here today!

β™₯️ β™₯️ β™₯️

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×